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secretary in mississippi. he had fought for his country in world war ii. before coming home to fight for justice here. his assassination by a white supremacist in june of 1963 helped to inspire the march on washington. joining me now is myrlie evers williams, the widow of medgar evers and a legendary civil rights leader in her own right. and historian taylor branch author of the trilogy of books on dr. king and the civil rights movement. thank you both for being on tonight. >> it's a pleasure. >> thank you. >> let me start with you ms. evers williams. your husband was killed in june of '63, and it was part of what really ignited the movement that had already started around having this march. you were the speaker at that march and didn't make it. and one of the things we're most proud of is tomorrow you're going to make that speech at lincoln memorial for the march on washington. >> well, thank you. >> 50 years later. >> thank you ever so much. >> tell us what was running through your mind as you fought in mississippi and the climate in 1963. because i don't think people understand th
finishing up my new book and this particular chapter is about sex. apparently mississippi is the dumbest state. that would concur in the sex chapter because they have the most std's in america. >> mississippi is burning. >> wow. >> bill, ninety 8% of the people sur -- 98% of the people surveyed say the worst state is whatever one you happen to be in at the time. thought? >> i don't like the theme of the show. this study proved the united states of america is like one big new york apartment. we don't know anything about our neighbors and everything we know is completely wrong. i brought this back to new york because we are rude and era gapt. arrogant. >> new york won best sports fans. you can make a case or not. but it also won worst sports fans. the last time i checked boston is not in new york. >> you just proved your point. >> coming up, what is it like to be owned more than anybody else on twitter. first, what is up with the obama's new dog? something impeachable i'm sure. pbjócqkb+ámñt>zyû >> sunny is a portuguese water dog. clearly we must discuss this important news in the -- >
of the rain stays east of the mississippi and more severe storms headed into the northeast on friday. and we get rid of everything on saturday. saturday looks better in the northeast. if you are going to jones beach and along the cape, 81 in boston. it will be nice for saturday. showers in the mid atlantic all the way back here along the mississippi. still dry across the west with the exception of areas across northern washington and northern montana. 83 in kansas city on sunday. we dry out in the nation's midsection. on monday we are looking at showers in arkansas, oklahoma, down in the southeast. still 78 in chicago. we're not shaking the cooler than average weather around the great lakes. 96 in salt lake city. wednesday looks quiet with the exception of the southeast. what's new? you can get the latest weather weekday mornings on wake up with al at 5:30. ♪ [ bats squealing ] we weren't really morning people. we're vampires after all. then we tried this nutri-grain fruit crunch bar. it's so crunchy. crunchy granola, mmmm... made with real fruit, 20 grams of whole grains. now, we love mor
nonviolent coordinating committee in greenwood, mississippi. she was on the staff of the march of washington. also, kweisi mfume. and the national editor for "vanity fair," the author of the upcoming book, "an idea whose time has come, two presidents, two parties and the battle for the civil rights act." thank you for joining me. congresswoman, i want to start with you. you have probably some very distinct memories. i was talking about the fact that for people who experienced it, it probably feels like yesterday. for people born after 1963, it feels like ancient history. take us to washington 1963 on that august day. >> well, 1963 was the high point of the civil rights movement in many ways. haven't worked on the staff of the march, being young and foolish, i expected a whole lot of people to come. but nobody really knew how many would come. what was really challenging was the unprecedented nature of the march. there had never been a mass march in washington, much less for civil rights. so if people asked me about what was the -- what do you remember most, frankly, it was not necessarily the
. the sad thing when i was in the georgia legislature we used to say thank god for mississippi because mississippi was always worse than georgia. now we have to say thank god for north carolina because north carolina has become the new mississippi. >> you know, brian, let's talk about north carolina. north carolina up until recently was seen as a sort of a bastion of progressism of the south. yet north carolina now is not exactly a bastion of anything progressive. >> no. i think that's right. one of the scary things for people who are committed to civil rights in this country is that the pace of which we have retreated from basic protections. what i'm most concerned about is these legislatures a lot of them in the south and other parts of the country actually take pride in their resistance to responding to the challenges that face people of color, that face the poor, that face the disadvantaged. they are proud of the fact that they are creating barriers to voting. in north carolina there was something called the racial justice act that was design to deal with the horrific disparities w
in mississippi to senator john stennis. in the presidential party were bob haldeman and john hurlman. >> we were on air force one. we were going off to dedicate a john stennis memorial rocket launcher or something in mississippi. and i'm standing on the flight deck, and it occurred to me for about 30 seconds that i could crash this airplane and that would put an end to everybody's problems. mine, nixon's and haldeman's, everybody who was aboard. i stepped off that airplane, and usually the drill is richard nixon steps off the airplane and all the cameras click away and all that. he got off and nobody paid any attention to him. i got off and boy, they were all taking morgue shots. >> in the very last conversation i had with him there, we were talking about this break-in, in california. the elsberg psychiatrist break-in. and he said, i didn't know about that, did i? and i had to indicate to him that he did know about it. >> that, of course, is a totally out of our -- have you ever heard of this? >> yes, sir. >> i never heard of it, john. i should have been told about that, shouldn't i? >> i'm not
carolina, north carolina, texas, mississippi, colorado. i don't know, pretty red states. unfriendliest, new jersey, california, michigan. >> liberal, liberal. >> go to mississippi for vacation. >> oakland is a beautiful city that is rotten. it is rotten because of liberal policy. >> i want to agree with my colleague here from wherever he is from. you are right. if you look at just the crime rates i would bet you the crime rates up against you would find a direct correlation. >> and economic freedom. if you look at a person's ability to start a business and sustain. if you go to places like in the top ten you will have that opportunity plus i think the weather is great in sonoma, california. >> the weather is great in oakland. >> it is because it is unfriendly. >> right to work states. no taxation. >> that's what they stop and think about because they are happier. they don't pay taxes. they don't have to pay union dues. >> can you blame detroit for being unfriendly? >> i wouldn't want there to be a city. >> i wouldn't want to live there. also, albany has the state government of new york. so
? that's right. high school geography for $800. joe. what is the mississippi river? yes. high school geography for $1,200. [ beep ] right there in the heart of new york -- manhattan. back to you, joe. pop culture for $400. barrett. what is "transformers"? no. emily. what is "avatar"? "avatar." correct. new in merriam-webster for $400. emily. what is an aha! moment? that's right. merriam-webster for $800. joe. what is a bucket list? correct. new in merriam-webster for $1,200. barrett. what is a song? song. correct. new in merriam-webster for $1,600, please. joe. what is an element? yes. new in merriam-webster for $2,000. emily. what is gassed? gassed. yes. pop culture for $800. barrett. what is a mustache? no. joe. what is a beard? a beard. very black beards. yes. joe, back to you. pop culture for $1,200. watch out for night monsters as you build your own 3-d online world using this game. emily. what is "minecraft"? correct. pop culture for $1,600. [ beep ] and that comic is steve harvey. back to you, emily. pop culture for $2,000. listen. ♪ everybody talks, everybody talks ♪ ♪
view is former mississippi governor ronnie muss grove of the chair of southern progress fund. a multistate pact that plans to ensure their resources are put towards democrats in the south. thank you for joining me today. >> thank you for having me. >> tell us about the plan you will be announcing tomorrow. >> we have all scent republicans take over the state legislature. and produce an agenda that would make strom thurmond blush. i sit back and think someone will lead the charge against this loonicy. it didn't happen. so we plan it change that. >> if we look at democratic shift, the emerging election torate we saw in 2008 and 2012 seems like it'll play a huge role in opportunities in the south. >> not only that, if you look at the actual numbers, for instance, in arkansas, we would only have to flip two seats in the house for it to go democrat. three in louisiana. four in mississippi. receiven in alabama. if you start looking at those numbers, and you look at the democratic -- demographic shields happening all across the south, i plef it is a great opportunity for us a to bui
to go back. all of that plus breaking news. there was a miracle today in oxford, mississippi. reinforced with scratch- resistant glass and a unibody made kevlar strong. okay google now. call my droid. the new droid ultra by motorola. when strength matters, droid does. ♪ the joint is jumpin' osteo bi-flex® helps strengthen your joints.° like calcium supplements can help your bones, osteo bi-flex can help your joints.° osteo bi-flex... the best stuff in the joint.™ now in joint and muscle formula. >> shepard: u.s. senator ted cruz says nothing against canada but is he an american. he was indeed born in canada but his mother is a u.s. citizen. he says he actually has dual citizenship both countries. now he plans to give up the canadian citizenship. senator cruz recently won a straw poll of 2016 conservative denver. made two trips to iowa. home of the nation's first in the nation presidential contest and staffers say this week is he planning to visit new hampshire. the first primary state san diego mayor bob filner is trying to settle a sexual harassment lawsuit against him from the c
of the -- and i came up from mississippi where i had been working with the student nonviolent coordination committee in the mississippi delta, and i was standing right up there near the lincoln statue where the people are gathered all on the steps then. i guess post 9/11, you can't have them so close, and i remember that the best view was not when i would come down and look up. the best view was when i would look out and see that the march, which had a lot of doubt hanging over it, would people really come, because there had never been a mass march on washington before for any cause. would they come? how would they be received and here, i could not see the end of the people. march by any measure had been a success, more people for any cause had gathered on this space 50 years ago. >> we thank you for taking the time now to help us remember that day 50 years ago and educate many of us who don't remember it, but know of its power in the history books. thanks so much. our live coverage of the march in washington continues next hour. former d.c. mayor, marian berry, will be joining us live. he
that these were phoneo scandals like the mississippi river they keep rolling and keeps getting bigger. i think the republicans are doing well. i think they are very methodical and are not hysterical. they are pursuing it and it will take time but they are pulling on it a thread at a time. >> what about that? if it starts expanding beyond the irs that starts to become more of a problem for the administration. >> they are not supposed to share information but the threat would be that they are sharing information for political purposes to undermine conservatives. in this situation that is not clear. they shared it with the enforcement division of the federal elections commission. so there could be a legitimate reason to see if somebody has tax exempt status to see what they are requesting and then requesting similar status from irs. we don't know. but the idea is and i think that there was testimony from lerner that there had been no sharing of data whatsoever. so now we have an exception to the rule apparently and of course that compounds all the suspicious about lerner and the fact that she has
on the southern mississippi valley. the northeast, is the beautiful spot. temperatures staying below normal. more rain in the forecast by the end of the week. >> we need you to settle something for us. >> gustnado's are real? they don't have to involve sharks? >> always sharks. >>> scary moments for fire crews in boise, idaho running away from a house on fire. look at this just before the collapse. 55 firefighters on the scene battling a three-alarm blaze. they realized something was wrong. radioed for colleagues to get back. they did. >> oh, my goodness. look at that collapse. terrible. >> minor injuries. >> before we move on, it's great to have you back. >> you miss me hitting you, right? beating on you. >> fully recovered. >> i love being back. i showed pictures on twitter. i had a fabulous surprise this morning. it's amazing. >> don't go away, ever again. >> so sweet. you have a big heart. >> 11 minutes past the hour. is student viciously attacked on a bus. the driver, watching the brawl from the front of the bus. should he have stopped the fight. you are going to hear why he didn't, coming u
live in new york, but i'm a mississippi girl. i like the braves. >> a view on a-rod, playing tonight. not playing well. but he has $175,000 after being exposed as a cheat. >> i think he could care less at this point. he's made a ton of money. set some records. he feel, ah, my legacy is set in other ways. i could care less what would michael have thought? not a lot, i suspect. >> jo think he was really at the top of michael's list of concerns in life. michael was believer in fairness and i don't think he would have approved of a-rod necessarily. >> were you surprised by the incredible outpouring of attention that michael's death got? the tributes and accolades that came? >> i think it's a real testament to his legacy and what he stood for, and you know, what a passionate supporter he was of liberty, of human rights, of freedom. of the right to free speech, and so i was definitely, it meant so much to me. all the lovely thing that people, and your tribute. thank you so much for that, too. >> an incredible force. a brave, courageous man. it's desperately sad. for us, everyone in the med
in the united states, and not alabama or mississippi. we're talking about new york city, madison avenue. >> have you experienced it in new york? >> not as much because new york is sort of my city, and i tend to go places where i'm expected. i think in someways, i've started to do that because i don't want to have these kinds of experiences. >> so you're almost avoiding it? >> exactly. i have been, you know, passed up by a taxi driver. i've also had a taxi driver yell something foul at me -- >> both of us. >> i have been. i might be more -- >> just because i'm annoying. >> where as i've had some foul "n" word yelled at me on a new york city street. >> have you really? >> absolutely in the middle of the street. >> they aren't talking to me. it's not what they call you, it's what you answer to. i know what i am and i won't allow anybody to put me in a box. >> has it gotten better since the first black president of the united states or not? >> yeah, it's not so much that it's gotten better. i think it's become more of a conversation, and, you know, the race conversation is one that black america has
are on alert in the mississippi river valley where continued heavy rain could trigger intense flooding. brian is live for us with more. >> reporter: much of the midwest and southeast is pummeled by torrential rains and ten inches of rain falling on friday flooding hundreds of homes and businesses in states like colorado, kansas, missouri and tennessee. floodwaters sweeping through roads and highways in colorado. 1.3 inches of rain following in only half an hour causing this fast moving mudslide along highway 24 killing a man. muddy water carrying homes and debris. three others are still missing. listen to this woman who held on to dear life as the home rushed right by her. >> at that moment i knew that the water was getting higher and coming over it. then the bottom broke off and it went through. i said i have to get out of here. i was screaming for help and i watched them rescue a dog. i watched the house go by. i watched cars go by. >> reporter: missouri, 15 inches of rain in two-day period. in some areas in southwestern parts of the state, floods killing a four-year-old boy and his mother
of the eight states that are highest were louisiana, mississippi, states like this. one of the things that's interesting to me is the states that ended up lowest on the list were not the most liberal or coals mott policy tan. they were the whitest states, like north dakota, idaho, and northern new england. so there's this just lingering craziness that still exist it is out there. obviously there's a tactics to the take on votes rights, but we also have to consider the possibility and i think the president is sort of considering this that we're a bit more racist than we like to think. >> we're here in new york city where the stop-and-frisk, the fact that the judge sheindlin has rule that stop and frisk is unconstitutional, hats given rights to a huge debate about whether people of color truly are treated equally. you have mayor bloomberg say this policy is good for minority communities and you have a judge who says it's unstill independents and african-americans have been saying for decades that profiling is wrong and feels wrong, and it reduces -- there's been this unwillingness to tackle
who had gone to mississippi to visit his family. he was in a store. he made a comment about a white woman and that led to him being picked up by a bunch of racists and murdered. that was the emmitt till reference. >> brutally murdered. >> to say the least. >> shot through the head, thrown into the river. >> all for making a comment about a white woman that was not all that offensive. >> was it fair to to relate the trayvon martin case -- >> i don't think so. till became a symbol for that era and i don't think that was the right example. >> i don't know. i think there will always be a difference of opinion and it will never change, so why don't we just move on. i think oprah can have a lot of fun with us by constantly saying things every day, seeing if we will cover it. like you know what, i don't want mayonnaise on my tuna fish sandwich. then "the five" the next day will go tuna fish, really, oprah, tuna fish and mayonnaise? what is wrong with you! what is happening to you! could this hurt your brand? >> i like mayonnaise! >> i hate tuna fish but love mayonnaise. >> it is weird, yo
in mississippi, i was 14 years old. and it was scary as hell. my father was arrested over 50 times and i got arrested with him once, myself. my mother would never bail him out. after the third time the sheriffs called, this time they called and said well, your son is with them. they bailed us both out. and i said next year, pop, how about we go to the beach? >> all right, so this is for me, from deborah k., i just wanted to know where did she go to college and what prompted her to be a conservative? >> i went to the university of arizona, bear down, go wildcats, my parents were conservatives, i'm a daughter of the american revolution. i wrote a letter to bill clinton when i was 6 years old, about how our taxes are too high. all right, this is for all of us. this is from tim c. you have just been nominated as ambassador of the united states, congratulations, which country, and why? >> england, because it is the only place i could speak the language. >> brazil, i love their energy policy. >> i love their women. >> of course. >> awesome. >> if i chose a country i wanted to be from, other than t
is oliver waylon leathers born may 19th in mississippi weighing 7 pounds and 10 ounces. his parents nathan and mary beth are enjoying every minute because he's growing so fast. >> he looks like he says, what happened? >> big congratulations. if you want a chance for your baby to appear in our today's johnson's baby of the week go to klgandhoda for details. >>> it's try day friday. we have our white gloves on. there's some beautiful dancers over here. jubilee dancers. >> should we go join them? >> yes. they are from bally's in las vegas. one of them is catherine. the other is kathy. and the other is kelly ripa. nice to meet you guys. a lot of kathys here today. first of all, you are here in new york doing auditions for other kathys to go to vegas and be a jubilee dancer, right? >> yes. >> what's so difficult to do? >> it's pretty hard. there's lots of kicks. lots of bevels. >> why don't you show us a couple of moves. >> the hardest part is getting the body to look like yours. >> it's not going to fit hoda's head. >> i believe. >> ow, that's got to hurt her. >> it's fine. it's good. no, it's
. make no mistake, president obama believes there mississippi be accountability for those who would use the world's most heinous weapons against the world's most vulnerable people. nothing today is more serious and nothing is receiving more serious scrutiny. thank you. >> i'm trace gallagher in for shepard smith. just heard secretary of said john kerry giving his first accounts of the crisis in syria. the secretary delivers litany of what they believe is the proof that chemical weapons were used in syria. as important as what he laid out is what when he did not lay out, is a time line of dealing with syria, going after the regimes. what the did lay out there have to be consequences for any action, any chemical weapon used and said the president at some point in time will decide what to do but made it very, very clear the secretary of state believes there will be some type of action used against sirra, but keep in mind, we have u.n. inspectors on the ground, and seemed to indicate that did not matter. the inspectors would fine there was the use of chemical weapons but could not determine
're not breaking the law. the kids wish network has faced fines before in utah and mississippi. the fines, all those fines added up to a little more than $6,000. >> unbelievable. how that woman sleeps at night and she's there shaking your hand and acting like everything is proper. this kid's wish network, they have been around a long, long time. >> since 1997, and listen to this, this is interesting. it began with a different name. the fulfill a wish foundation, which sounds a lot like make a wish, right, anderson? >> yeah. >> the folks at make a wish actually sued forcing fulfill a wish to change the name. that's how they got to the kids wish network. we found that as quite common, too. the less than forthcoming charities they want names that sound very much like respected charities. >> the bottom line, there are good charities out there. people can go to charity navigator to find out actual ratings of charities. >> you really should. the last thing you should do is have the phone ring and find a telemarketer on the other end asking you for money and telling you all the great things they're g
, what happened to emmitt till, august 28th, 1955, that this kid visiting mississippi from chicago was said to have wolf whistled at a 21-year-old white woman, carolyn bryant, then goes back to a shack where he is staying with a distant uncle, great uncle, and three or four days later the woman's husband comes in the middle of the night with his stepbrother, drags him out of bed. they spend the entire night beating emmitt till to a pulp, to a pulp, then they take him out, shoot him in the head, then take his bullet ridden beaten body, wrap a cotton gin, throw it in the talahatchie river. how is that the equal of what happened between george zimmerman and trayvon martin? i don't know. but people think somehow with their grievance agenda it is. it lessens the credibility of today's civil rights movement. greg? >> you know what, i didn't need a civil rights movement, i'm just a white guy. maybe there will be one for short white people that smoke, i don't know. it is hard for me to say. i do believe there's kind of a battle for survival in this movement and a movement should police its
are up from the gulf coast and florida panhandle all the way into south carolina. gulfport, mississippi, the floodwaters receding there but with more rain in the forecast they may rise yet again. tracking it all for us is chad myers. what do you have? >> anderson, when you have a stationary front, like a stationary bike, things don't move. these storms aren't going anywhere. so what is raining now was raining an hour ago and what was raining this weekend is pretty much still raining at this point. look at these five-day rainfall totals. that is a beach. not much of a beach vacation. panama city, popular place, ten inches of rainfall over the weekend. everywhere that you see red, that's six inches. at purple higher than that, and the ten-inch bulls eyes, macon, georgia, has 24 more inches on ground than they should have. so when it rains, it floods. there's no place for the water to soak in. it's been like that for days and days and days and the rain continues. there are very few happy people in atlanta thinking can i go to a baseball game? it's raining every day, literally, anderson. >>
in the '60s and -- >> in mississippi. >> yeah, and i'm a -- not only that a student of my history. i've said this many times, it's not a part of who i am to use that word, i understand why other people do. it's impossible for me to do it because i know the history, and i know that for so many of my relatives whom i don't know, who i don't know by name, people i'm connected to, my ancestors, that was the last word they heard as they were being strung up by a tree. that was the last sense of degradation that they experienced as, you know, some harm was caused to them. i just -- it's just not a part of the fabric of who i am. so out of respect to those who've come before and the price that they paid to rid themselves of being relegated to that word, i just don't use it. >> i understand lee daniels said that he used to use the word, and you two had a discussion -- >> i said lee, you ain't going to be using that word around me. lee, no you're not going to use that word around me. and i think it's used appropriately in the film. i mean, i think, you know, in the moment where the clearance williams
to be a person that is helping the cause and not coming against it. >> you grew up in mississippi? >> i did. kelly, i am two generations short from maids and farmers. it's because of my father, the late reverend james thomas mcclowen, that my mother got to go to high school. he built the first black high school in mississippi, my town. we have a long way to go. my father worked heavily to help integrate schools in mississippi. but today we don't have a level playing field when it comes to education. today the new plantation is the prison system. we have more black males in the prison system. so with the hard work that my father did and by the way, he was assistant warden also in the prison where before my father got there, there were chain gangs. my father really believed that you could rehabilitate the criminal. so we have a long way to go with the inner city, with people now on welfare, more so than ever before. so we have equal opportunity. do we have equal access? >> jack gains, thank you. joe freeman, good friends of mine. thank you both. juan williams, always good to have you. angela,
can't get fresh salmon. >> mississippi number two, alabama number three. >> bad accents. >> we're the craziest state. >> california tops the list. >> craziest state and you adopt even mention florida? come on. that doesn't make sense at all. >> i've lived in florida and florida has all the of the weirdest news stories. don't certain websites have pages just devoted to florida weird news. >> u.s. news, foreign news, sports, florida. >> colorado also has a lot of weird news. >> fun to talk about. everyone has their own opinion. >>> a sad scene, hundreds of dolphins mysteriously dying along the east coast. why is this happening and what does it have to do with humans? >> and is today the day the -- >> boy band. >> i shouldn't read this. what do i know. it's 'n sync, are they getting together? brand-new evidence your favorite boy band and needless to say mine is making a comeback. >> nervous, tucker is reading this one. he does have all their albums. we're new to town.ells. welcome to monroe. so you can move more effortlessly... we want to open a new account: checking and savings.
game in her home- state of mississippi. thomas has a day job.she's a pharmaceutical rep. she and her husband have two sons. coming up on the kron 4 morning news. economists are hoping for good news when july's jobless figures are released this morning. we'll have those numbers for you at 5:30. the giants struggled but they didn't give up against the phillies thursday night. we'll have all the highlights from the game. and we're watching bay area weather your full forecast coming up after the break. top stories we're following on this friday august second. one person is dead following a late night crash near the port of oakland. we're live with what happened. at least a half dozen cars are destroyed after a of carport fire that happened just two hours ago. what investigators think happened and a look at the damage, coming up. and notice has been given. the threat of a bart strike come monday is feeling more like a reality. the latest with negotiations and a look at alternate transportation options. more on these stories in just a minute, but first lets get a quick check of your friday
's the deal for those of you that don't know, 14-year-old black kid in mississippi, 1955, flirted with a white woman. a few days later, two white racists attacked him, shot him to death. this is who she is comparing trayvon martin. i feel like oprah diminished her brand. it was a missed opportunity. i was expecting her to take the high road and elevate the conversation and bring the country forward and add a little unity here. but instead she made this atrocious analogy and i am a little disappointed in her. >> i will say that was an awesome chandelier. >>> banned phrase. decimate. we discussed it in a block. i must have got 150 tweets telling me exactly what decimate means and that the president was using it incorrectly. i disagree, he was using it correctly. to decimate is to kill every tenth man. 90% of al qaeda is in operation because president obama says we have 10%, 90% left. >> that's technically what he meant. >> using decimate. >> if we stop using the words you tell us not to use, we can't talk any more. >> i want to ban every single word. >> get out. throw to "special report." >> tha
feel like they can go ahead. so texas first. maybe alabama. maybe mississippi. maybe north carolina after today. sometimes you use the bully pulpit. sometimes you have the authority to weigh in and stop something directly. sometimes when you lose that authority, as justice department did during the, with the voting rights act case. sometimes when you lose that authority, you instead decide you're going to sue. what is the range of options available to you? and how do you use it? how do you still try to make progress when some avenues toward the progress you want to make are blocked? on the issue of drugs and criminal justice, the obama administration made it a priority to try to reduce the huge disparity in sentencing for crack cocaine versus powder cocaine. i mean, if cocaine is the problem, why be so much more lenient for one variety of cocaine and so much more strict for the other? o on that issue, the administration found a lot of allies in congress. the build to reduce those sentencing disparities between crack cocaine and powder cocaine, that bill passed by a voice vote in the
. it was a horrible tragedy in mississippi. >> it's so easy during this time. trayvon martin paralleled to him. you get stuck in that and not allow yourself to move forward and see how far we've come. >> there is no comparison. >> it's a baseless claim. but getting back to her in switzerland, there's a pattern here. in 2005 in paris at a hermes store -- is that how you pronounce it? >> i wear jeans and sneakers. >> the store closed. oprah wants to go shopping. they told her she couldn't. she had a hissy fit and she screamed racism. >> i thought it was true. i remember that story. i remember thinking it was horrible. >> but there's video of it. and there's a statement from the store that said this is what happened. but oprah injected race into it. >> well, again -- >> can't compare trayvon. >> i wasn't there and neither was dineen. >> but you can't compare trayvon. emetil was a rascist, vicious hate crime murder. that's not the same thing. >> a lot of african-americans, not all, certainly not all, but a lot do feel that this is a very modern day version of it. because they feel like justice was not
mother black. they had to leave mississippi in the '60s to get married. >> how did it affect you, the idea that your parents' marriage was a crime? >> well, i think that it created in me a sense of psychological exile. >> and when she was 19, her mother was murdered by her former stepfather. >> that's the moment where i really tried in the language of poetry to make sense of that loss. >> here the dead stand up in stone. white marble on confederate avenue. i stand on ground once hallowed by a web of -- >> one of the themes of her work is memory. what gets left out of the nation's public record. she won a pulitzer prize in 2007 for native guard. about a forgotten black union regiment that fought in the civil war. >> we know it is our duty now to keep white men as prisoners. rebel soldiers. would-be masters. >> she wrote that poem in the library's reading room in seat 170. sometimes to rest her eyes, she would look up at a pillar marked poetry. >> now when i do it, i can't see the word poetry so clearly. but i have faith that it's there. >> so she will continue to cheer lead. for a
wants to hear freedom ring. every mole and mole hill of mississippi. you know that portion of the speech, right? at the 50-year anniversary of that moment at 3:00 p.m. tomorrow, bells are going to ring in d.c. and across the country and even apparently in places as far away as switzerland and japan. that's tomorrow afternoon. here's the other thing you need to know for tomorrow, though. even if you're not in a place where you can watch tv during the day, take a note of this for tomorrow night. this is something that never happens. tomorrow night, wednesday night at 8:00 p.m. eastern, msnbc has moved heaven and earth to get permission to air the "i have a dream" speech uninterrupted in its entirety. you think you have heard the whole speech, but you really probably haven't. access to the tape of the speech is very, very highly restricted. it is almost impossible to get permission to play even any large piece of it, let alone the whole thing. but tomorrow here on msnbc, at 8:00 p.m., we have moved heaven and earth to be able to play "i have a dream" uninterrupted in full. you should plan t
27th, 1960, we gathered to hear will campbell, a minister who had been run out of oxford, mississippi for playing ping-pong with a black man the day before we had gotten word from the nashville chief of police that anyone involved for the protests would be arrested. there were some rumors that drp the police did not intend to stop. campbell said, you attempt to sit in, the business community, the local officials, and their -- will all put back. they will let police and the rough element in the white community come into the stories and beat you, but it is your decision. they said go home, another man said, go home. another man said, what's the matter? are you chicken? no sooner did we stake our seats at the upstairs common than some young man began attacking the group downstairs. we immediately went down to join our brothers and sisters. violence does beget violence, but the opposite is just as true. spinning itself, pet -- when there's no fear in facing it. obedient subsided. stomping on people, the police conspicuously absent while we were beaten, arrived quickly after the mob wore t
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